Greenwood’s Mini-Meadow

At Greenwood House we would like to be more wildlife friendly. A space has been set aside with the idea of seeing how we could manage a wilder area designed to increase biodiversity.. It lies to the south of the building, beyond the plain rectangular lawns, the gravel paths, and cropped Whitebeam trees, and slopes down to the boundary that separates our property from the Council-managed grass and trees below.

It has just been a couple of weeks now since the last grass-mowing. By leaving the area to grow, it is hoped that the habitat will be enhanced and provide for greater numbers of pollinating insects and birds. A variety of grasses and wild flowers are becoming more apparent already. I am not certain of the accuracy of my identifications but I reckon we have Buttercups (Ranunculus sp.), Daisies (Bellis perennis), Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) and White Clover (Trifolium repens), Ox-eye Daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare), Sorrel or maybe Sheep’s Sorrel (Rumex acetosa or R. acetosella), Black Medick (Medicago lupulina), Hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), Cat’s Ear? (Hypochaeris sp.), ?Ground Ivy (Glechoma hereracea), Silverweed (Potentilla anserina), Common Whitlow Grass (Erophila verna) and Cock’s-foot Grass (Dactylis glomerata)., and much else not identified.

I shall be following our new mini-meadow’s progress with enthusiasm. This is just the first stage of a managed wild area to see how it might work out. Later, in the autumn, I understand that native wildflower seeds will be sown, and possibly some small plant plugs inserted.